Jewish Music Blog

September 15, 2005

Pey Dalid – Review

Filed under: Reviews — jewishmusic @ 8:43 pm

Generally, this album falls into the Chaim Dovid, Soulfarm catergory, whose philosophy is about “pure” music – limit the effects and the editing and try to capture the “live” performance feel. This has advantages and disadvantages – the most severe disadvantage being that the overall tightness of the album tends to suffer.

Unfortunately, this disadvantage manifests itself here too. The drummer is almost always in time, but there are those couple of off moments which I feel really subtract from the overall feel of the album.

Another general comment which I will refer to alot – I hate to say it, but the bass player lacks groove. He plays most of the songs like a ballad, which is only playing the bass note on the first note of each meaure or chord change. Occasionally his rhythm follows the melody, but he rarely gets into a groove, and he doesn’t follow the bass drum.

The first song, Am Yisroel, starts off with a intro full of cuts in which the bass player is noticeably off rhythm. I don’t understand why the mixer didn’t line up the parts – it’s really simple, especially for bass parts. Alternatively, they could have recorded the off parts again. I don’t really care for the answer-back harmonies either – it sounds like they just sang whatever came to their mind in the studio. Also, there are times where the harmonies should be in rhythm, but they’re not. The song itself isn’t very catchy, but it follows an interesting chord progression.

Shalom Aleichem – This song is more solid than the previous one, and the bass player even gets into a groove on the low part, but not the high part. Strange, I would think it should be the other way around. On the high part, the drummer plays a rock feel with the first two eighth notes on the bass. The bass player should follow this, but doesn’t. Instead he plays half notes with an occasional eight note anticipation. The low part is played in a disco/hora/half-time rock feel, and the high part is a straight rock feel, which makes it feel like the song is speeding up when in fact it isn’t. There is also tasteful violin by Rudy Harris. The harmonies are more rhythmically in time. There is a point in the song where it’s just the bass and vocals, but the vocalist sounds like he’s screaming and trying to sound edgy. I don’t really go for this.

Yom Zeh Yisroel has a cool sounding intro with cuts, but the rest of the low part also has these cuts. I feel that this takes away from whatever groove this song has. The drummer really gets into this song, and plays tasteful fills and grooves. There is even a little piano on this song, which sounds like a Yamaha keyboard.

The next song is a niggun, so there are no words. The drummer plays a reggae feel, but the rest of the band doesn’t. The high part moves into a rock groove which be so much better had the bass player simply played eight notes. This song introduces saxaphone – both alto and sorprano. I guess they’re going for that Dave Matthews feel.

Shabbat Shalom has a great low part. I really like the way it starts off with just rhythm guitar and vocals. The high part doesn’t paralell the low part though – it’s fairly boring. Halfway through this song they do a rap type thing. I’m not exactly sure what rap has to with Shabbos, though. I tried to decipher the words they’re rapping to, but it just sounds like random gibberish, especailly after 2:30 minutes of this stuff.

Boi V’shalom is next, although the jacket says Hamalach should be next. The intro has cuts, but they’re off AGAIN. There’s not much to this song – except for the fact that they sing “L’Cha Dodi no no no no no”. I guess they’re trying to copy the non-Jewish usage of “no no no no”. The problem is that in non-Jewish music it means no, here it has no meaning, it’s just something to sing, I guess.

The first two measures of Hamalach are a copy of the D’Veykus hamalach in minor. The drummer uses rod sticks.

Mi hu Zeh has reggae style organ comping.

Garden of Eden starts off with an E Major, G Major progression and then switches to E freigish. The song ends off with an eerie shofar blowing.

To sum it up – As I mentioned at the outset, this album is like Soulfarm and Chaim Dovid. If you like that style, you’ll probably like this.

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9 Comments »

  1. I liked the album.

    Comment by Anonymous — September 18, 2005 @ 3:28 am

  2. Great fresh sound!

    Comment by Anonymous — September 20, 2005 @ 2:55 pm

  3. after such a review i have to go and buy it

    brb

    Comment by Vos Iz Nies — September 21, 2005 @ 1:37 pm

  4. Well you people are fools. As I’ve said before on many blogs, these guys are really not very good. G-d bless them, it seems like they’re getting money from somewhere to perpetuate their hobby, and it sure as hell is not comming from me. I think Ben Jacobson’s review on Jpost referenced my previous attacks on this band for good reason- that being, despite being charming, sincere, and nice people-these guys make crappy music. They play in a certain style thaht people associate with spirituality and by virtue of that, uneducated jewish listeners will buy it. But there is no reason to do so. There is no reason a jewish ‘mystical jam band’ can’t get a drummer who can count, a bass player who knows how to play bass, and a guitarist who can improvise. Do they really need to subcontract any legit playing to Ruby Harris, who is becoming a cliche in this genre himself (more on that later)? Ben Jacobson and this post dance around the issue for the purpose of Shalom Bayit w/in the JM family. But it’s thankfully clear from the undertones of both reviews that this band is actually bad and its members need to take out some serious time in the woodshed honing their craft before they spring more crappy music on an unsuspecting and uneducated JM buying constituency. I think I’ve said all I need to say on the subject.

    Comment by Anonymous — September 23, 2005 @ 1:06 am

  5. It’s all about those undertones…

    Comment by keyboardguy — September 23, 2005 @ 6:44 pm

  6. I HAVE SOME INTERESTING INFO ON THIS CD IF ENQUIRING MINDS ARE INTERESTED,THE CD LISTS MIKE STRAUBER AS ADDITIONAL BASSIST SO BARRY SEFF IS NOT THE ONLY BASSIST ON THE CD. I UNDERSTAND MIKE PLAYS ON SONG 2 AND SONG 4 I DID NOTICE A DIFFERENT APPROACH TO THE BASS PLAYING, A MUCH BETTER APPROACH AS WELL.I FOUND OUT THAT MIKE STRAUBER PLAYED WITH ALOT OF REAL GOOD AND PRETTY POPULAR BANDS IN THE METAL AND JAZZ SCENE SUCH AS SONY RECORDING ARTISTS (CANDIRIA) RIGHT NOW CANDIRIA ARE THE BIGGEST METAL HARDCORE BAND AROUND, HE ALSO PLAYED WITH HARDCORE PUNK REGGAE LEGENDS BAD BRAINS AND ACID JAZZ JEWISH INSTRUMENTALIST JOHN ZORN I WONDER HOW PEY DALID HOOKED UP WITH THIS GUY.THE PEY DALID CD TO ME SOUNDS ECLECTIC AND SOLID I GIVE IT A THUMBS UP I CAN SEE MYSELF SPINNIN THE DRADEL TO THIS CD ……….

    Comment by NAT B HABERMAN — November 9, 2005 @ 5:24 pm

  7. great cd good feel excellent transitions great vocal harmonies.this cd is sellin pretty good in israel.they are promoting it in all the record stores.

    Comment by manachum blochsoffsky(from israel) — November 11, 2005 @ 9:47 am

  8. PEY DALID CD SOUNDS GOOD TO ME KEYBOARD GUY DOES NOT KNOW HOW TO WRITE A REVIEW LETS HERE HIS BAND PLAY,THE ONLY THING HE PLAYS GOOD IS THE SKIN FLUTE .PEY DALID ARE VERY GOOD THIS CD IS UP THERE WITH TOOL AND MATISYAHU AND RABBI BURNBAUMS HASIDIC METAL ORCHESTRA.

    Comment by IBRAHIM SHULMAN — November 11, 2005 @ 9:53 am

  9. Interesting.
    I’m also a fairly well educated professional musician, and used to listen to music and pick it apart for anything that didn’t suit me. THere comes a time when you learn, once again, to listen and enjoy music.
    Pey Dalid may not be the most refined group available in the genre, but it’s upbeat and fun to hear.
    I had an opportunity to hear these guys at a house party (of all things) and found them to be quite entertaining – and, contrary to one opinion found here, these guys aren’t “fake Jews” – they know their religion and live it. Anything you hear is the real deal.
    I can listen to this CD (and many others, I’m sure) and find every inconsistancy and misalignment, but I choose to enjoy it for what it is. Much more fun that way.–>

    Comment by Kevin — December 24, 2005 @ 10:17 pm


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